Bob Dylan Says Classic Literature Inspired His Nobel Prize-Winning Poetry

To his own surprise and much public debate, Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 2016 and just released his corresponding public lecture. In it, he cites works of classic literature as his inspiration and source material. When I started writing my own songs, the folk lingo was the only vocabulary that … Continue reading Bob Dylan Says Classic Literature Inspired His Nobel Prize-Winning Poetry

‘Imagination Is More Important Than Knowledge’

More gold from The Liberal Arts Tradition by Kevin Clark and Ravi Scott Jain: The teacher's job is then to mediate that great conversation using a variety of resources such as textbooks, secondary sources and even primary texts from the great natural philosophers and scientists themselves. Crucial passages from Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and Faraday are … Continue reading ‘Imagination Is More Important Than Knowledge’

How To Read (And Understand!) Einstein

This is one of the best examples of classical education I've seen. It is often difficult to find descriptions to clarify classical education's distinction and promise - this one does both. The quotation is a bit lengthy (so is my commentary) but it's worth it. In his excellent book about Christian classical education, co-author Ravi Scott Jain … Continue reading How To Read (And Understand!) Einstein

New Study Suggests Good Humanities Instruction Increases Math Knowledge, Too

University of Virginia cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham discusses some interesting results from a new study that finds good English teachers improved students' learning in math. First, ELA [English literature] teachers may, on average, provide a bigger boost to what are usually called non-cognitive skills: self-regulation, persistence, seeing oneself as belonging in school, and so on. … Continue reading New Study Suggests Good Humanities Instruction Increases Math Knowledge, Too

Why Putting Kids Into School Earlier And Longer Is Counterproductive

Two years ago the New York Times published an article talking about a trend that continues to accelerate: pushing academic instruction and seat time longer and earlier. Twenty years ago, kids in preschool, kindergarten and even first and second grade spent much of their time playing: building with blocks, drawing or creating imaginary worlds, in … Continue reading Why Putting Kids Into School Earlier And Longer Is Counterproductive

“Pretty Good”: A Famous Poem By A Famous Curmudgeon

In her Mere Motherhood newsletter for the CIRCE Institute (yes, you should subscribe), Cindy Rollins shares the following poem. Pretty Good by Charles Osgood There once was a pretty good student Who sat in a pretty good class And was taught by a pretty good teacher Who always let pretty good pass. He wasn’t terrific … Continue reading “Pretty Good”: A Famous Poem By A Famous Curmudgeon

How Classical Education Prepares Your Child For A Career That Doesn’t Exist Yet

Redeemer Classical School cofounder Joy Pullmann has a brother whose entire career path did not exist when he entered college. He works in social media, and makes a good living at it for a globally recognized media brand. Americans switch jobs frequently, and even switching entire careers is common (researchers debate how common, but they … Continue reading How Classical Education Prepares Your Child For A Career That Doesn’t Exist Yet

In The Era of Factory Education, Its Antithesis Surges

The Gospel Coalition has published a feature looking at the exponential growth in Christian classical education over the past two decades. It is a great introduction to what a classical education looks like and how it differs from what most Americans are used to by now. An excerpt: While calling education “classical” is new, the practice is … Continue reading In The Era of Factory Education, Its Antithesis Surges